Herman Hesse (1877-1962): Top Ten Conflict Tips

I have always had a soft spot for Herman Hesse and thought his insight might provide another of our Top Ten Conflict Tips: 

  1. Some of us think holding on makes us strong; but sometimes it is letting go.
  2. It is not our purpose to become each other; it is to recognize each other, to learn to see the other and honor him for what he is.
  3. If you hate a person, you hate something in him that is part of yourself. What isn’t part of ourselves doesn’t disturb us
  4. Our mind is capable of passing beyond the dividing line we have drawn for it. Beyond the pairs of opposites of which the world consists, other, new insights begin
  5. There’s no reality except the one contained within us. That’s why so many people live an unreal life. They take images outside them for reality and never allow the world within them to assert itself.
  6. It is possible for one never to transgress a single law and still be a bastard
  7. Words do not express thoughts very well. They always become a little different immediately after they are expressed, a little distorted, a little foolish.
  8. Happiness is a how; not a what. A talent, not an object
  9. You are only afraid if you are not in harmony with yourself. People are afraid because they have never owned up to themselves
  10. To study history means submitting to chaos and nevertheless retaining faith in order and meaning

See also: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hermann_Hesse

File:Hermann Hesse 2.jpg

 

 

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About creativeconflictwisdom

I spent 32 years in a Fortune Five company working on conflict: organizational, labor relations and senior management. I have consulted in a dozen different business sectors and the US Military. I work with a local environmental non profit. I have written a book on the neuroscience of conflict, and its implications for conflict handling called Creative Conflict Wisdom (forthcoming).
This entry was posted in Conflict Processes, Philosophy of Conflict, Top Ten Conflict Tips from Great Thinkers, Ways to handle conflict and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

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